Archive for Dystopian

Y: The Last Man


Title: Y: The Last Man
Author: Brian K. Vaughn
Year published: 2002-2008
Genre: Post-apocalyptic (near) / dystopia, adventure, graphic novel.
Threat: Plague (which only kills men).
Two words: Female dystopia.







Originally published as 60 episodes in a comic series, Y: The Last Man is now available in volumes more resembling graphic novels. As it should be deservedly preserved: the adventurous story is as strong as any in our book lists. Following a failing magician, a mysterious government agent, and a monkey, it charts the last man on Earth’s post-apocalyptic journey with a twist: he might be the last man, but the women are still alive.

What’s it all about?

On July 17, 2002, uninspiring escape artist Yorick Brown and his monkey Ampersand suddenly become the only male mammals left alive on Earth. A disaster, referred to as a plague, has killed everything else with a Y chromosome – and taken out a few women too, in the process. Hiding himself in disguise, Yorick starts a trek across America, determined to find his girlfriend (in far off Australia). Complications abound along the way, however, as Agent 355 determines to deliver Yorick to the new President, and ninjas, cloning and the generally violent state of Israeli throw spanners in the works.

Why read Y: The Last Man?

Disregarding that this is a graphic novel/comic, with great artwork and a generally faster style and pace to most post-apocalyptic literature, the backbone plot of this story makes for a clever angle on the apocalypse. Roughly half of the world is still alive, after all, and you’d expect the fairer sex, as it were, to do a good job of keeping things from turning towards the savage violence that’s all too common after the End. According to Y: The Last Man, though, a fallen society populated by women is as dangerous a place as any other dystopia.



In the Country of Last Things: dystopian despair

paul auster in the country of last things

Title: In the Country of Last Things
Author:Paul Auster
Year published: 1987
Genre: Dystopia, literary/drama.
Threat: A society abandoned and left to rot.
Two words: Scavenging survival.







As dystopian novels go, In the Country of Last Things is about as apocalyptic as they come. Somewhat out of character for contemporary chronicler Paul Auster, it is the story of a society that has fallen apart, and the people who continue to inhabit it, struggling to do nothing more than survive. The world Auster has created is a substantial and vivid vision – while the nature of the setting and the story give a sense of timeless decay.

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Wool: an e-publishing triumph

wool ebook adventure

Title: Wool
Author: Hugh Howey
Year published: 2011 (first story)
Genre: Post-apocalypse (far) / Dystopia, action/thriller.
Threat: Unknown; the outside world is lethally polluted.
Two words: Claustrophobic brilliance.







Hugh Howey‘s Wool has been around for a few years, first starting as a series of short stories and novellas, before reaching its ultimate omnibus form. The accomplished and affecting story is darkly confined to an immense underground silo, with the outside world uninhabitable. Perfectly capturing the brutal conditions of isolated communities long after an unidentified apocalypse, the characters are stuck in a perpetual loop of maintaining the silo, only occasionally stepping outside to clean the sensors that look to the desolate world outside. The atmosphere alone is worth soaking up, but the story of determined characters unravelling the truth about their confinement is well worthy of the setting – it’s dark, tense and uncomfortable, but brilliant, reading. It’s also a marvel of independent success from a highly respectable author. Read more

Wixon’s Day: accepting responsibility in a leaderless world

wixon's day post apocalyptic canal journey

Title: Wixon’s Day
Author: Phil Williams
Year published: 2012
Genre: Post-apocalypse (far) / Dystopia, action/steampunk.
Threat: Unknown; lack of heat and sunlight cause lasting problems.
Two words: Canal warrior.







Wixon’s Day is a slow-paced saga rife with philosophical musing, in a grimly realised bleak setting. Far in the future, the cause of the world’s current state is unknown; in fact, very little about the world’s history is known. This makes for a brooding drama where survival is the first order of business, and questions of morality, power and progress are very much ignored. By removing the sense of history and purpose from characters who are drawn into vast wars, it raises questions about exactly what everyone is fighting for, and what it takes to motivate someone to make a difference. Read more

Welcome to the end

This is the first post on the post-apocalyptic book emporium blog. Expect many updates, covering everything you could hope for relating to the post-apocalypse. Our interests will include book reviews, film reviews, upcoming apocalyptic news and related fields like dystopian and steampunk genre fiction.

If you have any questions, please contact me. I’m interested in hearing other post-apocalyptic book suggestions, and am happy to review independent authors’ work, as an independent author myself.

You will also find original fiction on this site, including my own novels, serial fiction and short fiction. All within the genre you hope for. With all the bleakness and despair of the post-apocalypse – it’s time to revel in the end.